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New Revenue Recognition Rules: Evaluating the Impact on Manufacturers

For over four years the business community has been discussing the impact Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, will have on financial reporting. As you evaluate the impact this standard will have on a manufacturers’ financial reporting practices, there are certain provisions of ASC 606 you should consider.

Then: Prior to ASC 606, manufacturers generally recognize revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the fees are fixed or determinable, and collection is reasonably assured. For most, this typically occurs when a product ships and the title to the product transfers to the customer.

Coming soon: Under ASC 606, effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 for non-public entities (December 15, 2017 for public entities), an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Under this core principle, an entity should:

1. Identify its contracts with its customers,
2. Identify performance obligations (promises) in the contract, 
3. Determine the transaction price, 
4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and
5. Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies the performance obligation. 


Who does it impact, and how?
For some manufacturers, ASC 606 will not impact their financial reporting practices since they satisfy their performance obligation when the product is shipped and the title has transferred to the customer. However, entities who manufacture highly specialized products may be required to recognize revenue over time if the entity’s performance creates an asset without an alternative use to the entity, and the entity has an enforceable right to compensation for performance completed to date.

Limitations
To determine if a product has an alternative use, the entity must assess whether it is restricted contractually from redirecting the asset for another use during production, or if there are practical limitations on the entity’s ability to redirect the product for another use. A contractual limitation must be substantive for it to be determined to not have an alternative use, e.g., the customer can enforce rights for delivery of the product. A restriction is not substantive if the product is largely interchangeable with other products the entity could transfer between customers without incurring a significant loss.

A practical limitation exists if the entity’s ability to redirect the product for another use results in significant economic losses, either from significant rework costs or having to sell the product at a loss. The alternative use assessment should be done at contract inception based on the product in its completed state, and not during the production process. Therefore, the point in time during production when a product becomes customized and not generic is irrelevant. If it is determined there is no alternative use, the entity has satisfied this criterion and must evaluate its enforceable right to compensation for performance completed to date.

Definitions and Distinctions
ASC 606 defines a contract as “an agreement between two or more parties that creates enforceable rights and obligations”. Accordingly, the definition of a contract may include, but not be limited to, a Purchase Order, Agreement for the Sale of Goods, Bill of Sale, Independent Contractor Agreement, etc. In applying this definition to business operations and revenue recognition, an entity must consider its individual business practices, and possibly individual customer arrangements in determining enforceability.

Once it is determined that the entity has an enforceable right to a payment, the amount of payment must also be considered. The amount that would “compensate” an entity for performance to date should be the estimated selling price of the goods or services transferred to date (for example, recovery of costs incurred plus a reasonable profit margin) rather than compensation for only the entity’s potential loss of profit if the contract were to be terminated. Accordingly, a payment that only covers the entity’s costs incurred to date or for the entity’s potential loss of profit if the contract was terminated does not allow for the recognition of revenue over time.

Compensation for a reasonable profit margin need not equal the profit margin expected if the contract was fulfilled as promised. Once the “enforceable right to compensation for performance completed to date” requirement has been met, an entity will then assess the appropriate method of recognizing revenue over a period of time using input or output methods, as provided under ASC 606.

For manufacturers of highly specialized products there may not be a simple answer for determining appropriate revenue recognition policies for each customer contract and evaluating the impact can be a challenging endeavor.

Next steps
If you would like guidance in analyzing the impact ASC 606 will have on a manufacturer’s financial reporting practices, including the potential impact it may have on bank covenants, borrowing base calculations, etc., please contact one of our dedicated commercial industry practice professionals.

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