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Segmenting Accounts Receivable Reports: How to Use Your Reports to Understand Where You Are

In a previous blog post, “Six Steps to Gain Speed on Collections”, we discussed the importance of regular reviews of long-term care facility financial performance indicators and benchmarks, and suggestions to speed up collections. We also noted that knowledge of your facility’s current payer mix is critical to understanding days in accounts receivable (A/R).

The purpose of a regular A/R review is to facilitate prompt and complete collections by identifying trends and potential system issues and then implementing an action plan. Additionally, an A/R review is used to report on certain regulatory compliance requirements, and could help management identify staff training and development needs. Here are some tips on how to make your review both effective and efficient.
  1. Practice professional skepticism. Generate your own A/R reports. While your staff may be competent and trustworthy, it is a good habit to get information directly from your billing system.

  2. Understand your revenue cycle calendar. A common approach is to generate A/R reports at the end of each month. While you can generate reports at any time, always ask your staff whether all recent cash receipts and adjustments have been posted.

  3. Know your software. Billing software usually has a few pre-set A/R reports available, and you can customize some of them to simplify your review and analysis. Consult with your IT department or software vendor to gain a better understanding of available report types, parameters, options and limitations. Three frequently-used reports are:

    A/R Transaction Report: This report shows selected transaction details (date, payer, account, transaction type) and can help you understand changes in those parameters. Start with a “summary by type” then drill down to further detail if needed. Run and review this report monthly to identify any unexpected write-offs or adjustments in the prior period.

    A/R Aging Report: This report breaks A/R data into aging buckets (current, 30, 60, 90, etc.). It is used to fine-tune collection efforts and evaluate a bad debt allowance (as older balances are less likely to be collected). Using a higher number of buckets will provide more detailed information, and replacing “age” of accounts with a “month” label will make it easier to see trends in month-to-month changes. Your facility’s payer mix will determine a reasonable “Days in A/R” benchmark. Generally, you should see the most dramatic drop in open accounts within 30 days for Medicare, Medicaid and private payers; and within 60-90 days for other payers. Focus your staff’s attention on balances nearing 300 days, as many insurers have a claim filing limit of one year from the service date. Develop an action plan to follow up within two to three weeks.

    Unbilled Claims Report: This report shows un-submitted claims. Discuss unbilled claims with your staff, understand why they are unbilled to reduce the number of un-submitted claims, and develop an action plan for submission to responsible parties.

  4. Understand available report formats. Billing software usually offers the option to run reports in different file formats (web, PDF, Excel, etc.). Know your options and select the one you are most comfortable with. We recommend Excel for easy data analysis and trending.

  5. Segment, segment, segment — and look for trends! Data segmentation and filtering is the best approach to effective and efficient A/R review. At a minimum, you should be separating Medicare A, Medicare B, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, private pay, pending/presumed Medicaid and any other payers with a particularly high volume of claims. The differences in timing of billing, complexity, compliance requirements, benchmarking and submission of claim methods warrant a separate, more-detailed review of claims. Here are some examples of what to look for.

    Medicare: An open claim will hold payments for all following claims within that stay. Instruct your billing team to ensure claim submission, and review any rejected or suspended claims. Carefully analyze any Medicare credits. Small credit and debit balances may indicate errors in the rate-setting module of your software. Review for rate changes, contractual adjustments and sequestration set up. Review any credit balances over $25 for potential overpayment. These credits have to be corrected in that quarter or listed on your quarterly credit balance report to Medicare. Balances of $160 or more may indicate incorrectly calculated co-pay days, while balances over $200 may indicate billing for an incorrect number of days. Medicare has a one-year limit on submitting claims so act promptly to resolve any balances over 300 days.

    Medicaid: Open balances may indicate eligibility gaps, changes in coverage levels, rate set-up errors or incorrect classification as primary or secondary payer. This payer also has a one-year limit on submitting claims. Again, act promptly to resolve any balances over 300 days.

    Pending/Presumed Medicaid: Medicaid application processing times vary by state. Normally eligibility is determined within a few months at the most. Open claims older than 120 days should be investigated promptly.

  6. Filter data for the highest and lowest balances. Focus on your five to ten highest balances and work with staff to resolve. Discuss reasons for any credit balances with staff, as regulations often require a prompt refund or claim adjustment. Credit balances could also indicate incorrectly posted payments (to the wrong patient account or service date). Instruct staff to routinely review and resolve credits to prevent collection activities on paid-off accounts. 

Ask questions, follow up and recognize good work. If you notice an improvement in your facility’s A/R report, make sure you recognize team and individual efforts. If improvements are slow to come, discuss obstacles with staff, refine your A/R reporting, and review the plan as needed.

 

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