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SaaS: Is it right for you? Making SaaS determinations a snap.

While new software applications help you speed up processes and operations, deciding which ones will work best for your organization can quickly evolve into analysis paralysis, as there are so many considerations.

Case in point: Software as a Service (SaaS) model
The benefits of the SaaS model, in which a vendor remotely hosts an organization’s applications, are fairly well known: your organization doesn’t have to shell out for costly hardware, the vendor tackles upgrades, backups, data recovery, and security, and you have more time and money to focus on your business goals.

There are multiple factors to look at when determining whether a SaaS solution is right for you. We’ve compiled a list of the top three SaaS considerations:

1. Infrastructure and capacity
Your organization should consider your own people, processes, and tools when determining whether SaaS makes sense. While an on-site solution may require purchasing new technologies, hiring new staff, and realigning current roles and responsibilities to maintain the system, maintaining a SaaS solution may also require infrastructure updates, such as increased bandwidth to sufficiently connect to the vendor's hosting site.

Needless to say, it’s one thing to maintain a solution; it’s an entirely different thing to keep it secure. An on-site hosting solution requires constant security upgrades, internal audits, and a backup system—all of which takes time and money. A SaaS model requires trust in your vendor to provide security. Make sure your potential vendor uses the latest security measures and standards to keep your critical business data safe and secure.

2. Expense
When you purchase major assets—for example, hardware to host its applications—it incurs capital expenses. Conversely, when you spend money on day-to-day operations (SaaS subscriptions), it incurs operating expenses.

You should weigh the pros and cons of each type of expense when considering a SaaS model. On-site upfront capital expenses for hosting hardware are generally high, and expenses can spike overtime when you update the technology, which can be difficult to predict. And don’t forget about ongoing costs for maintenance, software upgrades, and security patches.

In the SaaS model, you spread out operating costs over time and can predict costs because you are paying via subscription—which generally includes costs for maintenance, software upgrades, and security patches. However, remember you can depreciate capital expenses over time, whereas the deductibility of operating expenses are generally for the year you use them.

3. Vendor viability
Finally, you need to conduct due diligence and vet SaaS vendors before closing the deal. Because SaaS vendors assume the responsibility for vital processes, such as data recovery and security, you need to make sure the potential vendor is financially stable and has a sustainable business model. To help ensure you receive the best possible service, select a vendor considered a leader in its market sector. Prepare a viable exit strategy beforehand so you can migrate your business processes and data easily in case you have any issues with the SaaS provider.

You must read—and understand—the fine print. This is especially important when it comes to the vendor’s policies toward data ownership and future migrations to other service providers, should that become necessary. In other words: Make sure you have final say and control over your data.

Every organization has different aspects of their situation to consider when making a SaaS determination. Want to learn more? It’s a snap! Contact the authors: Clark Lathrum and Matthew Tremblay

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