Views & Analysis from our Experts
bd-blog-hd-hires2.png

Meet Deadlines and Cut Costs: Five Steps to Faster Contract Negotiations

State governments regularly negotiate contracts with vendors. Unfortunately, these negotiations are often prolonged, which can have major downstream effects on projects, procurements, and implementations—including skewed timelines, delayed milestones, and increased costs. Here are five suggestions for shortening contract negotiations. 

1.  Limit project scope. Leaner project scope equals shorter contract negotiations. Conversely, the sheer number of requirements, terms, and conditions for larger projects naturally inflate negotiations. Limiting scope means being conservative in what you are looking to achieve. Planning a core systems modernization? They can cost tens of millions of dollars. Limit scope (and cost) to just certain modules. If, for example, you have an ERP modernization, limit projects and procurements to key modules and milestones. 
2. Use project management techniques. Treat the negotiation like a small project. For example, compile a list of tasks and deadlines, as well as names for necessary signatures. Develop a project plan and hold weekly check-ins to keep things on track. Assign someone in your organization as a single point of contact to help shepherd the contract through the process. 
3. Make the vendor’s proposal part of the contract―verbatim. Some states still require copying the proposal response into a contract document, and that often requires modification of proposal language, which slows things down. Attach the solution proposal to the contract cover pages(s) so that the proposal is there, word for word. 
4. Have vendors define deliverables, except for the minimum deliverables you must have. Vendors should know how to deliver their product and services and should include items they expect to be paid for, such as completion of a development cycle, software licenses, and a gap analysis report. Rather than define what deliverables you need, let the vendors define them, except for any mandatory ones, such as a training or testing plan. Ask for interim or draft versions of training or testing plans as part of proposal submission. 
5. Tell vendors ahead of time what the payment constraints are. As a state government, you are bound by budget cycles and authority to spend. You also want working product tied to payment. With both factors in mind, tell vendors up front how much of the contract can be paid in a certain year and how much you are willing to tie to what deliverables. Don’t want to pay more than, say 40% of the project cost for non-software deliverables? Say so. Vendors can then plan their paydays and deliverable sequence accordingly. 

You can also save time and effort by not negotiating at all. States often assume there will be, or allow for, negotiation periods. Yet states can make clear that no negotiation will occur after contract award—or limit what can be negotiated to a small, finite number of items. To prepare for this approach, states should gleam vendor stipulations ahead of time, and perhaps even score vendors on the number or type of stipulations. Use a pre-award proposal clarification period to clarify any terms or demands that are unfavorable to the state and consider ranking or evaluating proposals on the number of objections to terms/conditions raised. 

States should feel empowered to shorten (or, when appropriate, even eliminate) contract negotiations. After all, state time is state money. Curious about other contract negotiation techniques? Contact me.

Leave a comment

STAY CONNECTED