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BerryDunn’s Cybersecurity Playbook for Management: Incident Recovery

All teams experience losing streaks, and all franchise dynasties lose some luster. Nevertheless, the game must go on. What can coaches do? The answer: be prepared, be patient, and be PR savvy. Business managers should keep these three P’s in mind as they read Chapter 8 in BerryDunn’s Cybersecurity Playbook for Management, which highlights how organizations can recover from incidents.

In the last chapter, we discussed incident response. What’s the difference between incident response and incident recovery?

RG: Incident response refers to detecting and identifying an incident—and hopefully eradicating the source or cause of the incident, such as malware. Incident recovery refers to getting things back to normal after an incident. They are different sides of the same resiliency coin.

I know you feel strongly that organizations should have incident response plans. Should organizations also have incident recovery plans?

RG: Absolutely. Have a recovery plan for each type of possible incident. Otherwise, how will your organization know if it has truly recovered from an incident? Having incident recovery plans will also help prevent knee-jerk decisions or reactions that could unintentionally cover up or destroy an incident’s forensic evidence.

In the last chapter, you stated managers and their teams can reference or re-purpose National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) special publications when creating incident response plans. Is it safe to assume you also suggest referencing or re-purposing NIST special publications when creating incident recovery plans?

RG: Yes. But keep in mind that incident recovery plans should also mesh with, or reflect, any business impact analyses developed by your organization. This way, you will help ensure that your incident recovery plans prioritize what needs to be recovered first—your organization’s most valuable assets.

That said, I should mention that cybersecurity attacks don’t always target an organization’s most valuable assets. Sometimes, cybersecurity attacks simply raise the “misery index” for a business or group by disrupting a process or knocking a network offline.

Besides having incident recovery plans, what else can managers do to support incident recovery?

RG: Similar to what we discussed in the last chapter, managers should make sure that internal and external communications about the incident and the resulting recovery are consistent, accurate, and within the legal requirements for your business or industry. Thus, having a good incident recovery communication plan is crucial. 

When should managers think about bringing in a third party to help with incident recovery?

RG: That’s a great question. I think this decision really comes down to the confidence you have in your team’s skills and experience. An outside vendor can give you a lot of different perspectives but your internal team knows the business. I think this is one area that it doesn’t hurt to have an outside perspective because it is so important and we often don’t perceive ourselves as the outside world does. 

This decision also depends on the scale of the incident. If your organization is trying to recover from a pretty significant or high-impact breach or outage, you shouldn’t hesitate to call someone. Also, check to see if your organization has cybersecurity insurance. If your organization has cybersecurity insurance, then your insurance company is likely going to tell you whether or not you need to bring in an outside team. Your insurance company will also likely help coordinate outside resources, such as law enforcement and incident recovery teams.

Do you think most organizations should have cybersecurity insurance? 

RG: In this day and age? Yes. But organizations need to understand that, once they sign up for cybersecurity insurance, they’re going to be scrutinized by the insurance company—under the microscope, so to speak—and that they’ll need to take their “cybersecurity health” very seriously.

Organizations need to really pay attention to what they’re paying for. My understanding is that many different types of cybersecurity insurance have very high premiums and deductibles. So, in theory, you could have a $1 million insurance policy, but a $250,000 deductible. And keep in mind that even a simple incident can cost more than $1 million in damages. Not surprisingly, I know of many organizations signing up for $10 million insurance policies. 

How can managers improve internal morale and external reputation during the recovery process?

RG: Well, leadership sets the tone. It’s like in sports—if a coach starts screaming and yelling, then it is likely that the players will start screaming and yelling. So set expectations for measured responses and reactions. 

Check in on a regular basis with your internal security team, or whoever is conducting incident recovery within your organization. Are team members holding up under pressure? Are they tired? Have you pushed them to the point where they are fatigued and making mistakes? The morale of these team members will, in part, dictate the morale of others in the organization.

Another element that can affect morale is—for lack of a better word—idleness resulting from an incident. If you have a department that can’t work due to an incident, and you know that it’s going to take several days to get things back to normal, you may not want department members coming into work and just sitting around. Think about it. At some point, these idle department members are going to grumble and bicker, and eventually affect the wider morale. 

As for improving external reputation―I don’t think it really matters, honestly, because I don’t think most people really, truly care. Why? Because everyone is vulnerable, and attacks happen all the time. At this point in time, cyberattacks seem to be part of the normal course and rhythm of business. Look at all the major breaches that have occurred over the past couple of years. There’s always some of immediate, short-term fallout, but there’s been very little long-term fallout. Now, that being said, it is possible for organizations to suffer a prolonged PR crisis after an incident. How do you avoid this? Keep communication consistent—and limit interactions between employees and the general public. One of the worst things that can happen after an incident is for a CEO to say, “Well, we’re not sure what happened,” and then for an employee to tweet exactly what happened. Mixed messages are PR death knells. 

Let’s add some context. Can you identify a business or group that, in your opinion, has handled the incident recovery process well?

RG: You know, I can’t, and for a very good reason. If a business or group does a really good job at incident recovery, then the public quickly forgets about the incident—or doesn’t even hear about it in the first place. Conversely, I can identify many businesses or groups that have handled the incident recovery process poorly, typically from a PR perspective.

Any final thoughts about resiliency?

RG: Yes. As you know, over the course of this blog series, I have repeated the idea that IT is not the same as security. These are two different concepts that should be tackled by two different teams—or approached in their appropriate context. Similarly, managers need to remember that resiliency is not an IT process—it’s a business process. You can’t just shove off resiliency responsibilities onto your IT team. As managers, you need to get directly involved with resiliency, just as you need to get directly involved with maturity, capacity, and discovery. 

So, we’ve reached the end of this blog series. Above all else, what do you hope managers will gain from it? 

RG: First, the perspective that to understand your organization’s cybersecurity, is to truly understand your organization and its business. And I predict that some managers will be able to immediately improve business processes once they better grasp the cybersecurity environment. Second, the perspective that cybersecurity is ultimately the responsibility of everyone within an organization. Sure, having a dedicated security team is great, but everyone—from the CEO to the intern—plays a part. Third, the perspective that effective cybersecurity is effective communication. A siloed, closed-door approach will not work. And finally, the perspective that cybersecurity is always changing, so that it’s a best practice to keep reading and learning about it. Anyone with questions should feel free to reach out to me directly.

 

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